SUBCHAPTER 06V - ELECTOLYSIS INFECTION CONTROL

 

21 NCAC 06V .0101 OFFICES

(a) Each electrolysis office, wherever located, shall:

(1) have a treatment table or other piece of furniture for placing clients for treatment;

(2) have at least one circuline type lamp, halogen lamp, or other type or magnifying lamp;

(3) have hand washing facilities on the same floor and toilet facilities in the same building, both with a supply of either soap or a germicidal skin preparation for washing hands;

(4) have a supply of labeled non-sterile examination gloves, cotton balls and antiseptic product for cleaning client's skin, materials for cleaning instruments and other items, materials for cleaning the workplace or documentation of cleaning contract, paper or cotton towels, and puncture-resistant containers and plastic bags for used materials;

(5) have sterilization equipment and supplies needed for the sterilization methods used;

(6) have a covered trash can and, if linens are used, a laundry bag or closed container for laundry, available to each workplace area;

(7) have storage facilities to contain the equipment, instruments, and supplies of the electrolysis practice;

(8) be inspected annually at each location where the licensee practices; and

(9) be inspected prior to the commencement of practice if the office is relocated.

(b) In addition to the items required in Paragraph (a) of this Rule, each laser practitioner office shall have the following:

(1) all doors leading to laser room shall have laser-specific safety signs displayed in accordance with American National Standard Institute (ANSI) Z136.1 Z136.1, which is incorporated herein by reference, including subsequent amendments or additions, and may be obtained at a cost of two hundred and three dollars ($203.00) from www.lia.org;

(2) no uncovered mirrors or reflective surfaces;

(3) laser safety eyewear that is labeled with the same wavelength and optical density as the laser device operated and that is worn while treatment is administered;

(4) all windows protected from laser beam with either an opaque material or white blinds;

(5) a fire extinguisher in the treatment room;

(6) face masks to be worn while treatment is administered; and

(7) an air filter.

(c) A laser, pulsed-light, or light-based hair removal practice shall be maintained in accordance with local zoning regulations.

(d) Laser, pulsed-light, and light-based devices shall be maintained and operated in accordance with Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) standards, which are incorporated herein by reference, including subsequent amendments or editions and may be accessed at no cost at https://www.osha.gov/SLTC/laserhazards.

(e) A copy of the current "Supervisory Agreement" shall be available in the office for inspection upon request.

 

History Note: Authority G.S. 88A-6(9); 88A-11.1; 88A-16;

Eff. June 1, 1993;

Amended Eff. September 1, 2010;

Readopted Eff. September 1, 2019;

Recodified from 21 NCAC 19 .0403 Eff. January 1, 2023.

 

21 NCAC 06V .0102 DEFINITIONS AND OVERVIEW

In addition to the terms defined in G.S. 88A, the following terms have the following meanings:

(1) "Alcohol-based hand rub or gel" means a preparation that contains 60 percent to 95 percent ethanol or isopropanol that is designed for application to the hands to reduce the number of viable microorganisms on the hands.

(2) "Antiseptic" means a germicide used on skin or living tissue to inhibit or destroy microorganisms.

(3) "Aseptic technique" means the term used to describe the precautionary measures taken to help reduce the risk of post treatment infections by decreasing the opportunity for microorganisms to enter the body. Precautionary measures include handwashing, disinfection, sterilization of surfaces and instruments, use of protective barriers, containment and disposal of waste, and instrument and surface manipulations that minimize cross contamination.

(4) "Autoclave" means a vessel used for sterilization by the application of saturated steam under pressure and heat.

(5) "Chemical indicator" means a chemically treated paper strip used to monitor parameters of a heat sterilization process by means of a characteristic color change. A chemical indicator does not indicate that sterilization has been achieved, but a chemical indicator indicates that the temperature needed has been attained.

(6) "Cleaning" means the removal of all visible organic material from objects using friction, detergent, and water prior to the disinfection and sterilization processes.

(7) "Contaminated" means the presence of potentially infectious pathogenic microorganisms on surfaces of a objects.

(8) "Continuing education unit" or "CEU" means one contact hour of participation in an organized learning experience that:

(a) is related to the practice of electrolysis or laser light-based hair reduction;

(b) is related to the scope of practice of a practitioner of electrolysis or laser light-based hair reduction;

(c) occurs after the original granting of licensure; and

(d) is approved by the Board at least 60 days before the event according to the standards set forth in G.S. 88A-13.

(9) "Cross-contamination" means the process by which bacteria or other microorganisms are transferred from one substance or object to another with harmful effect.

(10) "Critical items" means instruments, devices, objects, or environmental surfaces that will come in direct contact with the bloodstream or other normally sterile areas of the body.

(11) "Decontaminate" means to neutralize or remove dangerous substances or germs from an area or object.

(12) "Decontamination" means the use of physical or chemical means to remove, inactivate, or destroy pathogens on a surface or item so that they are no longer capable of transmitting infectious particles and to render the surface or item safe for handling, use, or disposal.

(13) "Disinfect" means to clean with a disinfectant to destroy bacteria.

(14) "Disinfectant" means a chemical agent used on inanimate surfaces and objects to destroy infectious fungi and bacteria, but not necessarily their spores, and is classified into levels of potency as follows:

(a) "High-level," which is utilized for the reprocessing of semi-critical instruments or devices and includes Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulated substances such as glutaraldehyde-, chlorine dioxide-hydrogen peroxide, orthophthaldehyde-, and peracetic acid-based formulations;

(b) "Intermediate-level," which is utilized for disinfecting tips for epilator needles and includes Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulated substances such as alcohols containing 70 to 90 percent ethanol or isopropanol, chlorine compounds, and certain phenolic or iodophor preparations as determined by the EPA;

(c) "Low-level," which is utilized for disinfecting environmental or non-instrument surfaces and includes EPA regulated substances such as quaternary ammonium compounds and certain phenolic or iodophor preparations as determined by the EPA.

(15) "Disinfection" means a procedure that reduces the level of microbial contamination and is classified into the following levels:

(a) "High-level," which inactivates some, but not necessarily all, bacterial spores. This process will also kill Mycobacterium tuberculosis var. bovis and all microorganisms except for high levels of bacterial spores.

(b) "Intermediate-level," which does not kill bacterial spores but can kill M. tuberculosis var. bovis, most vegetative bacteria and fungi, as well as viruses such as hepatitis B virus (HBV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV);

(c) "Low-level," which inactivates most bacteria, some viruses, and fungi, but not bacterial spores or Mycobacterium tuberculosis var. bovis.

(16) "Dry heat sterilizer" means a forced air oven-type device designed to sterilize items by exposure to high temperatures for designated exposure periods.

(17) "Environmental surfaces" means surfaces in the electrology treatment room that may contribute to cross-contamination by contact with the electrologist or instruments that will subsequently contact clients.

(18) "Enzyme detergent" means the detergent that helps break down organic soils and fats and suspends particles during cleaning. An enzyme detergent is used as a soaking solution for critical and non-critical instruments and as the detergent used in the ultrasonic device.

(19) "Epilator" means an electrical device used to perform electrolysis.

(20) "Epilator cords" means insulated plastic covered cords used to complete the current circuit between the epilator and the epilator needle or the indifferent electrode.

(21) "Forceps" means the sterilized instruments or "tweezers" used in electrology treatments to lift the treated hair from the follicle.

(22) "Gloves" means coverings for the hands that provide a protective barrier against infections and toxic substances.

(23) "Hand hygiene" means the general term that applies to:

(a) "Hand washing," the decontamination process for the removal of soil and transient microorganisms from the hands by a vigorous rubbing together of all surfaces of hands lathered with plain soap for at least 15 seconds, followed by rinsing under a stream of water;

(b) "Antiseptic hand wash," the washing of hands with water and soap or other detergents containing an antiseptic agent;

(c) "Antiseptic hand rub," the application of an alcohol-based hand rub product, to all surfaces of the hands to reduce the number of microorganisms present; and

(d) "Hand antisepsis," a preoperative antiseptic hand wash or antiseptic hand rub to eliminate transient microorganisms and reduce resident hand flora.

(24) "Health History Assessment File" means the cumulative and permanent documentation of a client's medical and treatment record that is maintained by the electrologist as set forth in Rule .0409 of this Section.

(25) "Hirsute or Hirsutism" means the excessive growth of hair that is thickened caused by hormonal or biochemical imbalances or genetic predisposition.

(26) "Home study" means an educational activity undertaken by an individual, completed by correspondence or online, and with a certification of completion awarded at the end of the course.

(27) "Hospital-grade disinfectant" means a chemical germicide that is classed in a spectrum of activity as either low-level or intermediate-level, as defined in Item (15) of this Rule, with labeled claims for effectiveness against Salmonella choleraesuis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

(28) "Indifferent electrode" means a stainless steel bar held by the client during electrology treatments to complete current circuit with galvanic electrolysis modality or with the use of a timer delay switch in automatic delivery epilators.

(29) "In-person seminar" means continuing education that occurs in a physical location rather than online.

(30) "Instruments" means tools or devices designed to perform a specific function within the field of electrology, such as grasping, holding, or retracting.

(31) "Intact skin" means skin in which the natural protective barrier has not been altered by infection or trauma.

(32) "Microbial" means a minute life form; a microorganism, especially a bacterium that causes disease.

(33) "Nitrile" means non-sterile, latex-free substance from which gloves are manufactured.

(34) "Needle" means the pre-sterilized, disposable wire filament that is inserted into the hair follicle for application of electrical current in electrology.

(35) "Non-intact skin" means skin in which there is a break in the skin's natural integrity, for example, exposed skin that is chapped, abraded, or afflicted with dermatitis.

(36) "Packaging" means a generic term meant to include all types of containment, such as woven or non-woven wraps, paper or film pouches, or rigid container systems.

(37) "Pathogen" means a microorganism or substance capable of producing a disease.

(38) "Phoresis rollers" means sterilized stainless steel rollers used to apply current to skin before or after electrology treatment.

(39) "Plain soap" means a detergent-based cleanser without antimicrobial additives that is used for the physical removal of dirt and transient microorganisms.

(40) "Protective disposable barrier" means a disposable, moisture-resistant covering that reduces the potential for contaminating environmental or medical device surfaces that may be difficult or inconvenient to clean and disinfect routinely, for example, tables, pillows, or hard-to-clean surfaces, such as light handles and epilator surfaces.

(41) "Reprocessing" means the process of cleaning, disinfecting, or sterilizing a reusable instrument that has been used or contaminated in order to be made safe for its intended use.

(42) "Semi-critical items" means instruments, devices, objects, or environmental surfaces that may come in contact with mucous membranes and non-intact skin, but do not ordinarily penetrate body surfaces. Semi-critical items require sterilization or exposure to high-level disinfection as set in Item (41) of this Rule.

(43) "Sharps container" means a manufactured and labeled, leak-proof, rigid, puncture-resistant, durable plastic container into which needles are placed after use and that is designed to be disposed of as an item of medical waste regulated by the North Carolina Department of Environmental Quality.

(44) "Standards" means the level of quality or excellence.

(45) "Sterility assurance file" means the record containing the sterilizer maintenance and use log and culture report from each biological monitor.

(46) "Sterilization" means the process that destroys all forms of microbial life. The methods of sterilization of instruments and items used in the practice of electrology are the dry heat sterilizer or the autoclave.

(47) "Treatment room" means the operatory where electrolysis treatments are performed.

(48) "Ultrasonic cleaner" means a device that uses ultrasonic waves transmitted through the cleaning solution in a mechanical process known as cavitation. The transmitted sound waves produce tiny air bubbles on instrument surfaces that scrub tightly adhering or embedded particles from solid surfaces and remove soil deposits from hard-to-reach areas.

 

History Note: Authority G.S. 88A-6; 88A-13; 88A-16;

Eff. December 1, 2010;

Pursuant to G.S. 150B-21.3A, rule is necessary without substantive public interest Eff. May 1, 2018;

Amended Eff. November 1, 2022;

Recodified from 21 NCAC 19 .0404 Eff. January 1, 2023.

 

21 NCAC 06v .0103 HAND HYGIENE

(a) Electrologists shall cleanse their hands by handwashing or by degerming through hand antisepsis:

(1) before and after treatment on each client;

(2) before donning gloves;

(3) immediately after gloves are removed; and

(4) immediately, if bare-handed contact with blood, body fluids, secretions, excretions, non-intact skin, mucous membranes or contaminated equipment occurs.

(b) As used in this Rule, handwashing includes:

(1) wetting hands with running warm water and applying plain soap in the amount recommended by the manufacturer;

(2) rubbing hands together at least 15 seconds, covering all surfaces of hands, including between fingers and fingernail areas;

(3) rinsing hands under a stream of water;

(4) drying hands with a clean disposable paper towel;

(5) turning faucets off with the paper towel; and

(6) disposing of the paper towel in a covered receptacle.

(c) As used in this Rule, hand antisepsis is achieved by:

(1) applying the product label recommended amount of an antiseptic alcohol-based gel or rinse to the palm of one hand;

(2) rubbing hands together, covering all surfaces of hands, especially between fingers and fingernail areas; and

(3) continuing to rub hands together at least 15 seconds or until the alcohol dries.

 

History Note: Authority G.S. 88A-16;

Eff. December 1, 2010;

Pursuant to G.S. 150B-21.3A, rule is necessary without substantive public interest Eff. May 1, 2018;

Recodified from 21 NCAC 19 .0405 Eff. January 1, 2023.

 

21 NCAC 06v .0104 USE OF GLOVES

Electrologists shall:

(1) Wear a fresh pair of non-sterile, medical grade, latex, nitrile or vinyl disposal examination gloves:

(a) during the treatment of each client;

(b) when contact with blood or other potentially infectious materials, mucous membranes and non-intact skin could occur; and

(c) during the procedures of soaking, cleaning, rinsing, drying and packaging of forceps and other contaminated instruments.

(2) Refrain from using latex gloves if the client's health history assessment file indicates a sensitivity or allergic reaction to latex-based products.

(3) Decontaminate hands in accordance with the procedures in Rule .0103 of this Section before putting on gloves and immediately after gloves are removed.

(4) In the event of an interrupted treatment session:

(a) remove and discard gloves;

(b) decontaminate hands before touching items or surfaces; and

(c) decontaminate hands before re-gloving with a fresh pair of gloves before resuming treatment.

(5) In the event of torn or perforated gloves:

(a) remove torn or perforated gloves immediately;

(b) decontaminate hands; and

(c) re-glove with fresh gloves.

(6) After each treatment:

(a) remove gloves;

(b) dispose in a receptacle located in the treatment room; and

(c) immediately decontaminate hands.

 

History Note: Authority G.S. 88A-16;

Eff. December 1, 2010;

Pursuant to G.S. 150B-21.3A, rule is necessary without substantive public interest Eff. May 1, 2018;

Recodified from 21 NCAC 19 .0406 Eff. January 1, 2023.

 

21 NCAC 06V .0105 cleaning, sterilization, and safety precautions for instruments and OTHER treatment-related ITEMS

(a) Each office of each electrologist and laser hair practitioner shall be inspected by the Board or its agent:

(1) prior to initial licensure;

(2) each time an office is relocated;

(3) annually after a license is issued; and

(4) at any time the Board deems necessary to ensure safety of the public, including in response to a complaint or inquiry.

(b) Electrologists shall observe the following safety precautions for the cleaning and sterilization of instruments:

(1) Coordinate sterilized instruments and supplies needed for each treatment in a manner whereby adherence to aseptic technique is maintained;

(2) Wear gloves when handling soiled instruments; and

(3) Avoid puncture injury from instruments.

(c) As used in this Rule, instruments and other items include:

(1) Needles that are:

(A) single-use, pre-sterilized, and disposable;

(B) stored in a manner that will maintain sterile conditions of contents;

(C) not recapped, bent, or otherwise manipulated by hand prior to disposal;

(D) placed in a puncture-resistant sharps container after use, when opened or found damaged, when contaminated before use, or when not used before pre-printed expiration date; and

(E) disposed of in accordance with State and local regulations when the sharps container is no more than three quarters full;

(2) Forceps, phoresis rollers, and epilator tips that are:

(A) disinfected before initial use and after use on the client;

(B) disinfected after a 24-hour period when packaging is opened and instruments are unused or when packaging is contaminated before use, for example, dropped or placed on a surface not protected by barriers;

(C) accumulated after use and before cleaning and sterilization in a covered holding container by submersion in a solution of a protein-dissolving enzyme detergent and water, following manufacturer's instruction for dilution, then rinsed and drained; and

(D) cleaned and sterilized in accordance with the standards in Paragraphs (d) and (e) of this Rule.

(d) Electrologists shall observe the following standards for cleaning:

(1) Place items and other instruments in the basket of a covered ultrasonic cleaning unit containing a fresh solution of a protein-dissolving enzyme detergent and water;

(2) Follow manufacturer's instructions for dilution and ultrasonic running times;

(3) Remove basket from ultrasonic unit rinse under running water and drain;

(4) Drain and air dry items on a clean, disposable, absorbent, non-shedding cloth in an area protected from exposure to contaminants with a hot-air dryer or by placement into a drying cabinet;

(5) Package forceps, rollers, and heat-stable tips individually in woven or non-woven wraps, paper or film pouches, or rigid container systems for the sterilization process;

(6) Place packaged instruments and items in an autoclave or dry-heat sterilizer with a chemical indicator;

(7) If dry-heat sterilizers are used, subject the heat-sensitive tips to an intermediate-level disinfectant, after which the tips are rinsed and dried; and

(8) Store instruments and items in a clean and dry covered container, drawer or closed cabinet after the cleaning process.

(e) Electrologists shall observe the following standards for sterilization:

(1) The required minimum time and temperature relationship for sterilization methods shall be:

(A) for the dry heat method, the minimum time-temperature relationship required to be attained is 340 F (170 C) for one hour or 320 F (160 C) for two hours; and

(B) for the autoclave (steam under pressure) method, the minimum time-temperature-pressure relationship required to be attained is 15 to 20 minutes at 121C (250F) and 15 psi (pounds per square inch) for unpackaged instruments and items and 30 minutes at 121 C (250 F) and 15 psi (pounds per square inch) for packaged instruments and items.

(C) temperature and exposure requirements in Parts (A) and (B) of this Subparagraph relate to the time of exposure after attainment of the required temperature and do not include a penetration of heat-up lag time, drying time, or cool-down time;

(2) Sterilizers shall have visible physical indicator gauges, for example, thermometers, timers, on the devices that shall be monitored during the sterilization cycle;

(3) The interior of the sterilization devices shall be cleaned according to the manufacturer's instructions;

(4) Packaging for sterilization shall:

(A) accommodate the size, shape, and number of instruments to be sterilized;

(B) be able to withstand the physical conditions of the selected sterilization process;

(C) allow enough space between items in each package for the sterilization of all surfaces to occur; and

(D) chemical indicators shall be visible on the outside of each package sterilized that indicates the instruments and items have been exposed to a sterilization process.

(5) Manufacturer's recommendations shall be followed for aseptic removal of contents in the sterilized packages;

(6) Biological monitors shall be used no less than once a month for each sterilization device according to manufacturer's instruction in order to ensure that proper mechanical function of the sterilizer is maintained; and

(7) Recorded laboratory reports from the biological monitors shall be filed in a permanent sterility assurance file.

(f) Safety precautions shall be observed for other treatment related items as follows:

(1) Indifferent electrodes, epilator cords, and eye shields shall be cleaned, dried, and subjected to intermediate-level disinfection before initial use and after each treatment and replaced when showing signs of wear and tear;

(2) Ultrasonic cleaning units and all other containers and their removable parts shall be used during soaking and cleaning procedures, cleaned, dried daily, and used and maintained according to manufacturer's instructions; and

(3) Environmental surfaces directly related to treatment shall be cleaned and subjected to low-level disinfection daily and whenever visibly contaminated.

 

History Note: Authority G.S. 88A-6(9); 88A-16;

Eff. December 1, 2010;

Amended Eff. September 1, 2015;

Pursuant to G.S. 150B-21.3A, rule is necessary without substantive public interest Eff. May 1, 2018;

Recodified from 21 NCAC 19 .0407 Eff. January 1, 2023.

 

21 NCAC 06v .0106 ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL AND HOUSEKEEPING

(a) Electrologists shall observe the following elements of environmental control:

(1) Each treatment room shall be kept lighted, ventilated, and free from dirt, dust, and contamination;

(2) Each treatment room shall be equipped with labeled containers, covered storage for supplies, a puncture-resistant sharps container labeled as a biohazard, and covered trash containers;

(3) Treatment table surfaces shall be made of materials that can be washed with detergents and treated with disinfectants;

(4) Treatment table surfaces shall be covered with newly laundered linens, new disposable paper drapes, or barrier before each client treatment;

(5) Headrests shall be covered with newly laundered linens, new disposable paper drapes, or barrier before each client treatment;

(6) Treatment table surfaces that may come in contact with bare skin during treatments shall be covered with newly laundered linens, new disposable paper drapes, or barrier;

(7) Containers for dispensing products, such as soap, alcohol hand-rubs, and treatment supplies shall be labeled;

(8) All treatment supplies shall be disposable or, if reusable, the supplies containers shall be cleaned and dried before being refilled with fresh products;

(9) Aseptic techniques for dispensing creams, lotions, ointments and antiseptics during treatment shall be followed;

(10) Manufacturer's recommendations for the use and disposal of products and containers when contaminated, or when expiration date is reached, shall be followed;

(11) Environmental surfaces that are touched during treatment, such as epilator needle holder and cords, epilator cart, magnification lamps, light devices and epilator controls shall be covered with a new protective disposable barrier before each treatment of a client or decontaminated after each treatment of a client, following manufacturer's instructions;

(12) Disposable items such as cotton, paper drapes and protective disposal barriers shall be stored in covered containers, closed cabinets, or drawers before use;

(13) Used disposable items shall be discarded into a covered trash container lined with a plastic bag that is tightly fastened when ready for disposal, and is disposed of daily into the trash, unless otherwise specified by State and local health regulations;

(14) Reusable items such as sheets, pillowcases, and towels that are used to cover the treatment table or as a client drape shall be stored in covered containers, closed cabinets, or drawers before use; and

(15) After use, reusable items shall be placed in a covered container labeled as "soiled laundry," laundered with detergent and water temperatures that will ensure cleaning and disinfection, and dried in a gas or electric clothes dryer.

(b) Electrologists shall observe the following elements of housekeeping:

(1) A low-level hospital-grade disinfectant registered with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) shall be used for cleaning non-critical environmental surfaces such as epilator surfaces, magnifying lamps, epilator carts, floors, walls, door knobs, tabletops, and window sills that will only contact intact skin;

(2) All other environmental surfaces in the treatment room shall be cleaned with water and detergent using a hospital-grade disinfectant or detergent designed for general housekeeping purposes, as indicated on the product label;

(3) Countertops shall be of smooth, non-porous material and shall be cleaned daily in the areas where cleaning and sterilizing of instruments and items takes place;

(4) Sinks and toilet facilities shall be cleaned daily;

(5) Non-critical equipment, such as doorknobs, telephones, and treatment tables in the treatment room, shall be kept cleaned and disinfected;

(6) Floors cleaned weekly and carpets shall be vacuumed weekly or more often if necessary; and

(7) Walls, blinds, and curtains shall be cleaned when dirty or dusty.

 

History Note: Authority G.S. 88A-16;

Eff. December 1, 2010;

Readopted Eff. September 1, 2019;

Recodified from 21 NCAC 19 .0408 Eff. January 1, 2023.

 

21 NCAC 06v .0107 CLIENT EVALUATION

As an evaluation for each client, the electrologist and laser hair practitioner shall:

(1) Prepare a Health History Assessment File that contains:

(a) the date, name, address, contact information, date of birth, and names of family physician, gynecological physician, and dermatologist, if applicable;

(b) the areas of face and body to be treated;

(c) the hirsute family history;

(d) any current and previous methods of hair removal;

(e) any current and previous medications;

(f) any current and previous physical examination dates and results;

(g) any skin irregularities; and

(h) the date and signature of client.

(2) Update and evaluate the client's current health condition to determine if the client should be referred to a physician.

(3) Examine the client's skin for signs of infection or rashes prior to each treatment and delay treatment if actual or potential signs or symptoms of infection are present.

(4) Refer the client to a physician when evaluation of health history or skin examination indicates.

(5) Instruct the client on post-treatment care to promote healing of the treated skin site.

(6) Update active client Health History Assessment annually.

 

History Note: Authority G.S. 88A-2; 88A-6;

Eff. December 1, 2010;

Amended Eff. September 1, 2015;

Readopted Eff. September 1, 2019;

Recodified from 21 NCAC 19 .0409 Eff. January 1, 2023.

 

21 NCAC 06v .0108 NEEDLESTICK SAFETY AND PREVENTION

Electrologists shall comply with the Needlestick Safety and Prevention Act published January 18, 2001 to amend United States Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA) Regulation 29 CFR 1910.1030, which is hereby incorporated by reference including subsequent amendments and editions. Copies may be obtained at no cost at: http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/bloodbornepathogens/.

 

History Note: Authority G.S. 88A-16;

Eff. December 1, 2010;

Readopted Eff. September 1, 2019;

Recodified from 21 NCAC 19 .0410 Eff. January 1, 2023.

 

21 NCAC 06V .0109 FOLLOW-UP PROCEDURES FOR EXPOSURES TO HEPATITIS, Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), AND OTHER BLOOD-BORNE PATHOGENS

Electrologists shall comply with the blood-borne pathogens standards contained in the Needlestick Safety and Prevention Act, published in United States Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA). Regulation 29 CFR 1910.1030. which is hereby incorporated by reference including subsequent amendments and editions. Copies may be obtained at no cost at http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/bloodbornepathogens.

 

History Note: Authority G.S. 88A-16;

Eff. December 1, 2010;

Pursuant to G.S. 150B-21.3A, rule is necessary without substantive public interest Eff. May 1, 2018;

Recodified from 21 NCAC 19 .0411 Eff. January 1, 2023.

 

21 NCAC 06v .0110 STANDARD PRECAUTIONS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION

Electrologists shall:

(1) Wear a mask and eye protection or a face shield to protect mucous membranes of the eyes, nose, and mouth during procedures and client care activities that may generate splashes or sprays of blood and body fluids;

(2) Wear scrubs, lab coat, or medical grade clothing to protect skin and prevent soiling of clothing during procedures and client care activities that may generate splashes or sprays of blood and body fluids;

(3) Remove soiled medical clothing at the conclusion of client procedures and wash hands; and

(4) Wear protective gloves to prevent puncture injuries when using or cleaning instruments and when disposing of used needles.

 

History Note: Authority G.S. 88A-16;

Eff. December 1, 2010;

Readopted Eff. September 1, 2019;

Recodified from 21 NCAC 19 .0412 Eff. January 1, 2023.